Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October, 2013


Please join us this Saturday as Adrian Andreescu leads the group through a selection of some of the most interesting AMC 8 problems.

cof-1stplace

And while you attend, if you meet the requirements below you can sign up for the AMC 8 according to the following instructions:

Hello All,

Hooray, it’s getting close to AMC 8 time again!  I’m handling signups differently this year.  First, here are the particulars for the test:

  • When:  November 19th at 5pm SHARP
  • Where:  The Davis Library
  • Requirements:  Must be in 8th grade or below and current school does not offer the test.
  • Cost:  $10 (The Davis library charges $50 for the program room, so I’ve had to increase the cost to cover all related fees)
  • What to bring:  number 2 pencils, protractor, compass (scratch paper will be provided).  NO calculators

If you meet the above requirements, then registration for the test will happen in person on November 2nd.  Here are the particulars to sign up:

If you have any questions, feel free to email me.

Best,

Kathy Cordeiro

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


Cantors_cubeThis week’s math circle presenter will be MMC participant and UTD student, Austin Marstaller.  He’ll be discussing Cantor Sets, a set of points lying on a single line segment that have a number of interesting properties.  Learning about Cantor sets is a great way to introduce general topology.
Announcements will also be made about how to register for AMC 8 if your school does not offer the test.  We look forward to seeing you!

Read Full Post »


cosmin3Abstract: We prove a few combinatorial gems by using induction on unexpected quantities.

Read Full Post »


Lissajous_animation
Let’s talk about the sine and cosine functions. One does not need to use very much information about these commonly seen functions in order to understand a large number of curves which can be drawn by graphing sine and cosine in Cartesian and polar coordinates. We will see sine curves, sums of sine curves, Lissajous figures, cycloids, hypocycloids, epicyclodes, and, of course, many rows of roses.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: