Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Alicia Prieto Langarica’


There are few things more gratifying than seeing a new Math Circle take root.  This time it is particularly exciting to see a new Math Circle in the metroplex.  The Mid-Cities Math Circle should be a great resource for students from the western end of the metroplex or anyone looking for more challenging and inspiring math during the week.  The following information is from their brochure.

Mid-Cities Math Circle (MC)² Seminar

Goals: The main goal of the Mid-Cities Math Circle seminar is to provide a stimulating environment for local area middle- and high-school students to learn mathematics. Regular attendance of the (MC)2 seminar will help students not only improve their individual problem-solving skills, but also enjoy and understand mathematics better. More specifically the Mid-Cities Math Circle seminar will

  • attract students’ attention to mathematics and motivate them to excel in the subject;
  • prepare students for mathematical contests;
  • introduce them to the beauty of advanced mathematical theories;
  • encourage them to pursue careers related to mathematics such as scientists, educators, engineers, economists, and business leaders.

General Information: The seminar runs every Spring Semester and is designed for students in 8th-12th grades.   students in lower grades are welcome as well but should be advised that a solid mathematical background is required in order to follow the discussions. For more information about the Mid-Cities Math Circle seminar please visit the following web-site:

http://www3.uta.edu/faculty/grandim/mathcircle

Applying for the (MC)² Seminar: There is no cost for attending the seminar. If you want to participate in the Mid-Cities Math Circle, please send an e-mail with your name, grade and your school name to Dr. Dimitar Grantcharov at grandim@uta.edu.

(MC)² Director

Dimitar Grantcharov, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Area of research: Algebra and Geometry

  • Session Leader, San Jose Math Circle, 2004-2008.
  • Guest Lecturer, COSMOS Program at UC Irvine, 1998-2003.
  • Bronze Medal, XXX International Mathematical Olympiad, 1989.
  • First place, VI Balkan Mathematical Olympiad, 1989.
  • First place, Bulgarian National Mathematical Olympiad, 1989.

(MC)² Faculty

Hristo Kojouharov, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Area of research: Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Biology

Gaik Ambartsoumian, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Area of research: Analysis and Integral Geometry

Steven Pankavich, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Area of research: Differential Equations and Analysis

Alicia Prieto Langarica
Ph.D. Candidate of Mathematics

  • Guest Lecturer, Metroplex Math Circle at UT Dallas, 2008.
  • First place, Mexican National Mathematical Olympiad, 2002.
  • First place, Mexican National Mathematical Olympiad, 2001.
Advertisements

Read Full Post »


I’ve enjoyed reading the Math 152 Weblog associated with the Discrete Mathematics course of the same name at Harvard.  Many of the posts should be of interest to Metroplex Math Circle attendees, but two recent posts struck me as being very similar to topics from our Fall 2008 lectures.

Math 152 helps you get jobs…

In this post a student talks about an interview he had with a quantitative trading firm which asked him to do a discrete path problem which was very similar to those Richard Rusczyk shared with us in his Math and Finance lecture.

Reading Project:  Groups, Factoring and Cryptography

This post built upon ideas that were introduced to Math Circle participants by both Dr. Bennette Harris and Alicia Prieto Lagarica in their lectures on cryptography.  It was particularly interesting that this Harvard student was able to apply his understanding of discrete math to the practical applications of RSA encryption just as Dr. Harris taught.

Read Full Post »


Alicia Prieto Langarica continued her tradition of actively engaging the students as they explored deep mathematical concepts. Ms. Langarica began with a discussion of the regular polyhedron and allowed the students to prove for themselves why there can be no more than 5. She then talked about these 5 Platonic Solids and gave some of the cultural context of these important objects.

From this basis, Ms. Langarica was able to describe the wide variety of non-regular polyhedron. As diverse as these objects are, they all have the common properties described by Euler. Ms. Langarica showed how the relationship between the number of vertices, faces and sides would be constant for all of these figures.

To involve the students more directly, the students built their own polyhedron and demonstrated their own diversity and talent. This break activity prepared them for listening to the more challenging portion of the lecture on Minimal Surfaces. Ms. Langarica described the very practical value of finding minimal surfaces to conserve cost or weight in construction projects. She then showed several beautiful examples of minimal surfaces.

By finding the surface normal of any point on a curved shape, Ms. Langarica showed how a minimal surface could be tested or created. To drive this point home, Ms. Langarica took the math circle outside with their polyhedron creations. By dipping these objects into soap bubbles she was able to beautifully demonstrate how minimal surfaces would form spontaneously as a result of the physical properties of the air and soap film.

Ms. Lanagrica has provided her slides from the lecture and answers to the problems. Members of the Metroplex Math Circle e-mail group can download these files from the group site. To join the e-mail group simply click below.



Click to join MetroplexMathCircle

Read Full Post »


October 11, we will begin with an introduction to polyhedrons and their properties. We will see why there is only a certain number of regular polyhedrons and we will talk about non regular polyherons as well. We will build our own polyhedrons, regular and non regular. Then we will introduce the concept of minimal surfaces and discuss its importance in various fields. The last activity is going to be a fun surprise that will illustrate minimal surface on different shapes.

Ms. Langarica is a mathematics Phd student at The University of Texas at Arlington. She has a BS in Applied Mathematics from the Univestity of Texas at Dallas and was a contestant in the Mexican Mathematics Olympiads for 5 years where she received one national silver medal and two gold medals. Since then, she has been involved continuously in mathematics Olympiads as a trainer and problem writer.

Read Full Post »


Alicia Prieto LAngarica began her talking by taking questions from the audience about her own experience in competitive mathematics and pursuing a Ph.D. in math. Being closer in age to the students than to the parents, she was much better able to connect with them and discuss some of the pressures that work against pursuing a passion for mathematics.

Ms. Langarica’s lecture built on the theoretical foundation set down by Dr. Harris on September 27th.  The presentation began with a review of the history of various coding techniques. With each example, Ms. Langarica challenged the students to describe its strengths and weaknesses.

She then taught the students how to encode a text message into the binary code corresponding to ASCII characters. She then showed how that using the XOR operation (binary addition without carrying) she could encode the message. Students were given the opportunity to quickly decode the message when given the corresponding key.

Finally, Ms. Langarica divided the students into groups of 4-5 and allowed them to use their creativity to develop their own codes. These codes were then shared between groups who used the probability of letter usage to attempt to decode each other’s code. The codes were very complex and diverse and showed that the students had learned a great deal from these two weeks of cryptography.

Ms. Lanagrica has provided her slides from the lecture and answers to the problems. Members of the Metroplex Math Circle e-mail group can download these files from the group site. To join the e-mail group simply click below.



Click to join MetroplexMathCircle

Read Full Post »


Please join us today for a lecture by Alicia Prieto Langarica.  She will build upon some of the ideas introduced by Dr. Harris last week on “Computer Data Encryption – Decrypted.” However, it is not necessary to have attended the September 27th session to learn a great deal from this presentation.  We will meet at 2:00 in our usual location: room 2.410 of the Engineering and Computer Sciences South (ECSS) building on the UT Dallas campus. The building is at the corner of Drive A and Rutford.  Please recall that this week we are moving to a 2 hour lecture format.

In addition to being one of our favorite lecturers, Ms. Langarica is a great example for young women who have a talent and a passion for mathematics.

Read Full Post »


October 4th, we will review the history of cryptography starting with the classic methods, medieval techniques, cryptographic mechanical machines and finishing with contemporary cryptographic methods. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method and we will try to come up with different cryptographic methods of our own.

Ms. Langarica is a mathematics Phd student at The University of Texas at Arlington. She has a BS in Applied Mathematics from the Univestity of Texas at Dallas and was a contestant in the Mexican Mathematics Olympiads for 5 years where she received one national silver medal and two gold medals. Since then, she has been involved continuously in mathematics Olympiads as a trainer and problem writer.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: